General Crime

* Nearly 100 SJPD Resignations–a Model for Other Cities to Follow?!

Scroll to the bottom to view and make comments

In the City of San Jose, the issue of pension reform became quite contentious over the last 18 months.  The story has been covered in local papers and the national media.   City officials and elected leaders argued that pension reform needed to occur and opted for the ballot box nuclear option rather than a solution involving the unions.  But did city leaders tell the whole truth?

I have read many articles, which vilified unions and public employees in general.  I watched as countless dollars were spent promoting the San Jose Ballot measure.  While all of this was occurring, unions agreed to give back 10% of their gross pay—a sacrifice that was quickly dismissed as the City pursued pension reform measures at all costs.  Meanwhile, internal alarms began ringing at the police department as staffing began to fall below even their expectations.

This month, the City of San Jose succeeded in bringing a ballot measure to the voters and getting it passed by 70% of voters (though turnout was remarkably low).  While some may claim victory, ignored legal warnings have predictably resulted in numerous lawsuits being filed, no pension reform being enacted and the taxpayers left footing the bill for what will likely be millions of dollars spent on an outside law firm hired to represent their interests.

Politicians have been quoted as stating that San Jose is the new model for other cities around the nation to follow.  They claim that other elected officials only need the political will and fortitude to move forward with San Jose style pension reform.   But what they haven’t told anyone is the staggeringly high number of officers who are resigning from SJPD and how this accelerating attrition rate is placing the citizens and officers at risk.

Citizens who were once accustomed to timely investigations and rapid response times are now finding that they have become a distant memory.  Calls for service are largely graded into four categories. Due to dramatically reduced police staffing most now are classified as non-priority level three.  These calls such as auto thefts, residential burglaries, audible alarms and traffic accidents often find citizens waiting hours for a police officer to respond. When officers do eventually arrive, evidence may have been lost, witnesses have left and routine solvability factors are likely compromised.  For cases requiring additional investigation, citizens are often shocked to find that their cases go uninvestigated or unsolved due to a lack of manpower.

So what is the truth?  Why are San Jose’s crimes going unsolved?  Proponents of the San Jose “Pension Reform Model” would like you to believe that recent unsolved crimes and delayed responses are the result of necessary cutbacks due to high pension costs.  What they don’t tell you is that due to the incredibly large number of officers that are resigning from the San Jose Police Department as a result of these policies, it is now impossible for San Jose to hire enough officers to come close to compensating for the loses. This problem is growing worse on a daily basis.

For many years, workers in the private sector have learned that they can move between employers, choosing those who appreciate their work and provide reasonable compensation.  Today in the City of San Jose, police officers are doing just that.  Our highly educated officers, who have been trained at an expense to San Jose taxpayers of more than $100,000 per officer, are now utilizing these skills to seek better opportunities with other departments.  This comes at a cost as long-standing community relationships begin to suffer and residents’ complaints go unanswered. In fact, local businesses now see rising crime in the downtown areas as a new restraint on the growth of their businesses.

Officers whose experience and commitment to the City of San Jose was once highly valued has been discounted and with it the officers commitment to work long-term for a community that may soon find itself in decline.

The laws of supply and demand are always in effect and other police agencies have already taken notice that the passage of Measure B in San Jose is providing them with an excellent opportunity to recruit top talent while saving millions of dollars in training costs.

I don’t know if this “New Model” is what local leaders had in mind when they sought pension reform through the Ballot Box rather than collective efforts.   I do know that the long-term effects have just started to be felt.  San Jose PD, which was once touted as a national model that other cities attempted to replicate, may soon be the national model for what to avoid.   Most medium to small size cities across America cannot afford to have 100 officers resign in eighteen months and hope to police their cities or even operate a police department.

Listed below are the nearly 100 officers who voluntarily resigned as the City of San Jose began their pay cuts and pension reform measures in January of 2011.   As of today, internal SJPD estimates show that at least an 40 additional officers may resign in the coming months rather than live through years of Measure B related litigation and continued benefit cuts.

I wish these officers the best of luck with their future careers and hope other cities take notice of what is occurring in San Jose.  I doubt most cities in the United States could tackle the attrition rates that San Jose is now facing. Where our once great city had over 1,400 police officers, today we have less than 1,065 and soon could have less than 1,000.   For the first time in my 23 years of service I fear for our department’s ability to ensure the safety and well-being of our residents.

The passage of Measure B will continue to be touted as a victory by local elected leaders and city management.  But this victory has come at a cost.

I have watched daily as the list of officer’s resigning from our department steadily grows. Today, I decided to write this article because the list has climbed to nearly 100 names!

Below is the list of officers who have left San Jose for better opportunities:

Officer C. Lewis
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
San Mateo PD
Officer Chad Ira
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Santa Cruz PD
Officer M. St John
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer L. Aquila
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Daly City PD
Officer J. Bottega
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Santa Cruz SO
Officer J. Riche
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Concord PD
Officer C. Figueiredo
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Concord PD
Officer J. Murray
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer K. Trinh
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Santa Cruz SO
Officer G. Wharton
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Vice President Start-up Co.
Officer G. Shyy
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
San Francisco PD
Officer M. Salazar
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer M. Bordoni
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer K. Pulsipher
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer G. Lilley
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer S. Cary
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer W. Sawkins
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer J. Robertson
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer J. Vincent
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer R. Warren
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Morgan Hill PD
Officer   V. Pimentel
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
San Leandro PD
Officer Griffin-Bagno
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Santa Cruz SO
Officer S. Mountain
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer V. Troia
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
P.S.C.S.
Officer C. Hathorn
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer D. Nibungco
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
San Francisco PD
Officer H. Habib
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
San Frnacisco PD
Officer T. Gimenez
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer C. Newton
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer S. Wagner
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer C. Fischer
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer D. Mattila
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Concord PD
Officer T. Cabral
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Refused to state
Officer D. Silva
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Santa Cruz SO
Officer K. Evans
Laid Off and Refused Re-Employment
Capitola PD
Officer R. McMilton
Resigned
Berkeley University PD
Officer J. Salkeld
Resigned
Palo Alto PD
Officer R. Harris
Resigned
Palo Alto PD
Officer D. Moser
Resigned
Elk Grove PD
Officer A. Figueroa
Resigned
Watsonville PD
Officer J. Kopp
Resigned
Round Rock PD-Texas
Officer R. Paul
Resigned
Santa Cruz SO
Officer J. Brownlee
Resigned
Santa Cruz SO
Officer J. Wright
Resigned
Santa Cruz SO
Officer D. Sullivan
Resigned
Santa Cruz SO
Officer E. Smith
Resigned
Englewood Co. PD
Officer B. Albalos
Resigned
Apple Computer / SIS
Officer T. Gimenez
Resigned
Escondido PD
Officer D. Berry
Resigned
Google
Officer M. Short
Resigned
Santa Cruz SO
Officer J. Emley
Resigned
Santa Cruz SO
Officer T. Cabral
Resigned
Roseville PD
Officer B. Loftus
Resigned
Attending Law School
Officer F. Hagg
Resigned
Santa Clara PD
Officer L. Larsen
Resigned
Santa Clara PD
A.C.  D. Urban
Resigned
Chief Hayward PD
Officer J. Kalsbeek
Resigned
San Leandro PD
Officer B. Kelsoe
Resigned
San Leandro PD
Officer K. Krauss
Resigned
Los Altos PD
Officer F. Banuelos
Resigned
Los Altos PD
Officer B. Jeffrey
Resigned
Los Altos PD
Officer R. Burke
Resigned
Los Altos PD
Capt. S. Savage
Resigned
Assistant Chief D.A. Office
Officer B. Rodriguez
Resigned
Oxnard PD
Officer J. Castro
Resigned
Redwood City PD
Officer S. Marello
Resigned
Refused to state
Officer P. Soper
Resigned
Fremont PD
Officer E. Martin
Resigned
Bothell PD Washington
Officer M. Ybarra
Resigned
Refused to state
Officer G. Ezard
Resigned
Walnut Creek PD
Officer D. Stromska
Resigned
Campbell PD
Officer B. Allison
Resigned
San Diego SO
Officer M. Aguayo
Resigned
Newport Beach PD
Officer M. Chan
Resigned
Fremont PD
Officer H. Kindorf
Resigned
Fremont PD
Officer Bartholomew
Resigned
Refused to state
Officer R. Sanchez
Resigned
Mountain View PD
Officer M. Millman
Resigned
Concord PD
Officer K. Nishita
Resigned
Colma PD
Officer D. Bonillas
Resigned
Mariposa SO
Officer C. Scott
Resigned
Berkeley PD
Officer D. Gerbrandt
Resigned
Santa Clara PD
Officer J. Brown
Resigned
San Mateo PD
Officer F. Wilkinson
Resigned
Daly City PD
Officer C. Watson
Resigned
San Leandro PD
Officer J. Rickert
Resigned
Santa Clara County DA’s Office
Officer C. Barnes
Resigned
Refused to state
Officer F. Abi-Chahine
Resigned
Refused to state
Officer M. Corona
Resigned
Refused to state
Officer R. Brennan
Resigned
Palo Alto PD
Officer J. Domenici
Resigned
Mountain View PD
Officer Corbin
Resigned
Belview PD Washington
Officer Thayer
Resigned
Redwood City PD
Officer O’Neil
Resigned
Redwood City PD
Officer F. Torrico
Resigned
Fremont PD
Sgt. R. Fong
Resigned
Santa Clara County DA’s Office

John Robb is Vice-President of the San Jose Police Officers’ Association

Comment Advisement We welcome your thoughts, but for the sake of all readers, please refrain from the use of obscenities, personal attacks or racial slurs. All comments are subject to our terms of service and may be removed. Repeat offenders may lose commenting privileges.

Leave a Comment

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons